Ancient Chinese Culture - Ancient China Life - Part 14

Sugar Painting

The sugar painting, also called inverse sugar figure or sugar light figure, is a traditional folk art form in China.

The sugar painting has a history of more than 400 years which can date back to the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644). It is said that it originated from the sugar prim minister. Read more »

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Forecast for 2011 of the Snake

For the snake, the year of 2011 will be an exciting year. In the year of the Rabbit, snakes will make remarkable improvement in their lives.

Career – Obvious progress will be made in their careers. For the snakes who have planned to change their jobs, it is the good time to implement. They will reach their goals easily as long as they keep staying positive.

Relations – Snakes should have more patience when deal with the relationship in the year of 2011. Read more »

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Imperial Rector’s Chair

The Imperial Rector’s Chair, also called Taishi Chair or Grandfather Chair, is a kind of chair with straight back and arms. They are large in size and usually placed in pairs with a tea table in between the two chairs.

The chair appeared in the Song Dynasty (960–1279). It was said that it was presented as a gift to Qin Hui (1090–1155), the prime minister and imperial rector and then it was given the name of the Imperial Rector’s Chair. Read more »

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Four Handsome Men in Ancient China

There are Four Beauties in ancient China, also, in Chinese history, there are four men renowned for their beauty.  There are many versions for the most handsome men in ancient China. However, these four (Pan An, Song Yu, King Lanling, Wei Jie) are widely accepted as the Four Handsome Men in ancient China.

Pan An

People usually use “Mao Si Pan An” (a man looks like the good-looking man named Pan An) to describe the appearance of a handsome man. Wherever he went, there was always a group of girls around him. But Read more »

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Konghou

Konghou, also known as Konhou, is a plucked stringed instrument in ancient China. It has wide diapason and sweet tamber, so it can be played in both solo and tutti performances.

Its history can date back to the Spring and Autumn (770-476BC) and Warring States (475-221BC) period. Originally, it was an indispensable instrument only played in the royal courts. As time went by, Read more »

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